You’re successful in business because you’re good at what you do: knowing how to repair and replace auto glass quickly and efficiently. Unfortunately, there are certain vehicles out there that are frankly, well, a pain in the glass.

Meet the challenge with some advance preparation.

Here are five that pose an extra challenge, and how to meet the challenge with some advance preparation.

GMC Acadia/Chevy Tahoe

Both vehicles share many of the same design features – including the windshield. While it comes out easily, what makes this windshield difficult to work on is that its shape is round and doesn’t set flush. Plus, the urethane height needs to be doubled to make it fit.

Tip: Try using a setting tool to ensure the glass is set straight with the extra urethane required. Otherwise, the possibility of a leak could occur.

Otherwise, the possibility of a leak could occur.

Ford F-150
As the best-selling vehicle in the U.S. for 33 years, this pickup truck is clearly popular with owners. With glass shop owners, not so much. That’s due to its all-aluminum frame.

Because most glass-setting tools are steel, this can pose a problem: if not handled with care, the tools could easily scratch the aluminum. And if that happens, the technician must treat the scratch with a rust inhibitor so it doesn’t cause corrosion.

Tip: Another way to avoid scratches is to look at using a tool like the Equalizer® Viper™, with a cut-out wire design that prevents scratching.

2015 Volkswagen Jetta
The windshield for this vehicle is easy to install – if you have the right windshield.

Somewhere along the line, the windshield’s model number was mislabeled with NAGS (National Auto Glass Specifications). This led to glass shops ordering what they thought was the correct windshield, and receiving a different model instead. The mistake isn’t discovered until a technician attempts to install the windshield, leading to confusion, frustration, and more than a few bad words.

The 2015 Volkswagen Jetta windshield is easy to install – if you have the right windshield.

Tip: When ordering glass for this VW, make sure you double-check the model number so you get the correct replacement to prevent any mix-ups.

Honda Pilot
A problem vehicle since 2009, when replacing the glass required an additional clip kit to complete the job. Well, not so much a problem vehicle; the real problem is ensuring you have the clip kit in stock ahead of time.

The plastic clips with double-sided tape are essential for seating the glass properly. Should a clip kit not be available, a skilled technician could still install the glass – it just won’t be done in a quality fashion. The chance of a leak occurring increases, and the next technician trying to replace the glass is going to have a more difficult time removing it.

Order the clip kit whenever ordering glass for the Honda Pilot.

Tip: Make it easy on everyone, and order the clip kit whenever ordering glass for this vehicle.

2015 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible
This car “bugs” glass repair shops. That’s because replacing its windshield means taking out much of the interior. Pillars, headliner, top center – these and more need to be removed in order to install the new glass, adding as much as an hour to the job.

The Beetle poses repair difficulties similar to the Lexus SC 430 convertible. In fact, convertibles overall are not easy when it comes to installing new glass. Since they don’t have a solid, stabilizing roof, installing the windshield is more complicated – and time-consuming.

Replacing the VW Beetle Convertible windshield means adding as much as an hour to the job.

Tip: Schedule these replacements so that you can dedicate the appropriate amount of time required and don’t feel the need to rush through the job to get to another appointment.

Be Prepared
The five vehicles mentioned here are not the only ones that can cause headaches for glass repair shops.

For instance, with such glass options as logos and electronics, the Jeep Cherokee has 22 separate windshields available. And the increase in smart glass windshields can create challenging installations.

To lower the difficulty factor for problem vehicles, techs should make sure they have the right glass part number for the vehicle they’re working on. And, they should always physically match the new glass to the glass being replaced.

By being as prepared as possible, you can cut down the problems associated with certain glass repair jobs – and the bad words.

Need more replacement tips, suggestions, or advice? Then visit www.serviceautoglass.com/download for more helpful information.